Tue Oct 21 15:00:59 SGT 2014  
    Genital Warts, Timor-Leste
HIV STD TESTING SINGAPORE™
Within 3 days after unprotected sex, stop HIV infection with Post-Exposure Prophylaxis treatment 10 days after unprotected sex, detect HIV infection with the DNA test 28 days after unprotected sex, accurately detect HIV infection with the 20 minute rapid test
Full & comprehensive sexually transmitted disease testing
Males: do not urinate for at least 4 hours before arriving
Females: testing is more accurate when you are not menstruating

Genital Warts, Timor-Leste | HIV STD TESTING SINGAPORE™

Summary

Genital Warts, Timor-Leste | HIV STD TESTING SINGAPORE™ @beautytimorleste_com: Genital warts (condyloma, condylomata acuminata, venereal wart, anal wart, anogenital wart, "cauliflower" sex disease) symptoms in men/women, screening/diagnosis, testing/check, treatment clinic, Timor-Leste - Private and confidential service. Definitions, references, and latest news.

Keywords: Genital Warts Timor-Leste, Timor-Leste Genital Warts, Genital Warts.

Description

Advertisement: Come to sunny Singapore to have your testing and treatment. Singapore Ministry of Health registered general practice (GP) clinic:
SHIM CLINIC
168 Bedok South Avenue 3 #01-473
Singapore 460168
Tel: (+65) 6446 7446
Fax: (+65) 6449 7446
24hr Answering Tel: (+65) 6333 5550
Web: Genital Warts, Timor-Leste
Opening Hours
Monday to Friday: 9 am to 3 pm, 7 pm to 11 pm
Saturday & Sunday: 7 pm to 11 pm
Public Holidays: Closed
Last registration: one hour before closing time.
Walk-in clinic. Appointments not required.
Bring NRIC, Work Pass or Passport for registration.

Sexual risk (of HIV/STD/pregnancy), and what you can do before and after exposure.

Timeline Event / Available resources
HIV STD Pregnancy
Before exposure
Abstain from sex, Be faithful, or Condom use
Circumcision (males only)
Contraception
(females only)
HIV PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) STD vaccine:
- Hepatitis vaccine
- HPV vaccine
STD / HIV exposure
Unsafe sex / unprotected sex:
No condom / Condom broke / Condom slip
0-72 hours HIV prevention
HIV PEP (post-exposure prophylaxis) treatment
- Stop HIV infection after exposure.
STD testing
If STD symptoms appear, then do STD treatment.
- Males: Do not urinate for at least 4 hours before arriving.
- Females: testing is more accurate when you are not menstruating.
Emergency contraception
(females only)
2 weeks HIV DNA PCR test
1 month 20 minute SD Bioline HIV Ag/Ab Combo HIV rapid test:
- Fingerprick blood sampling.
3 months 20 minute OraQuick® HIV rapid test:
- Oral saliva or
- Fingerprick blood sampling.
Full & comprehensive STD testing
- Males: Do not urinate for at least 4 hours before arriving.
- Females: testing is more accurate when you are not menstruating.

References


Latest News

Human papillomavirus 66‐associated subungual squamous cell carcinoma
Mon, 20 Oct 2014 00:00:00 +0100 | The Journal of Dermatology
(Source: The Journal of Dermatology)

Distribution of high‐risk human papillomavirus genotypes in HPV‐infected women in Beijing, China
Mon, 20 Oct 2014 00:00:00 +0100 | Journal of Medical Virology
In this study, HPV 16 and HPV 52 were the most common subtypes found in patients with cervical lesions. J. Med. Virol. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Source: Journal of Medical Virology)

The Estimated Impact of Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Coverage on the Lifetime Cervical Cancer Burden Among Girls Currently Aged 12 Years and Younger in the United States
Sat, 18 Oct 2014 05:10:46 +0100 | Sexually Transmitted Diseases
AbstractUsing a previously published dynamic model, we illustrate the potential benefits of human papillomavirus vaccination among girls currently 12 years or younger in the United States. Increasing vaccine coverage of young girls to 80% would avert 53,300 lifetime cervical cancer cases versus 30% coverage and 28,800 cases versus 50% coverage. (Source: Sexually Transmitted Diseases)

The Estimated Lifetime Probability of Acquiring Human Papillomavirus in the United States
Sat, 18 Oct 2014 05:10:46 +0100 | Sexually Transmitted Diseases
ConclusionsOur results are consistent with estimates in the existing literature suggesting a high lifetime probability of HPV acquisition and are supported by cohort studies showing high cumulative HPV incidence over a relatively short period, such as 3 to 5 years. (Source: Sexually Transmitted Diseases)

New Chapter in Our Understanding of Human Papillomavirus-Related Head and Neck Cancer [EDITORIALS]
Fri, 17 Oct 2014 00:00:00 +0100 | Journal of Clinical Oncology
(Source: Journal of Clinical Oncology)

Human Papillomavirus and Overall Survival After Progression of Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma [Rapid Communications]
Fri, 17 Oct 2014 00:00:00 +0100 | Journal of Clinical Oncology
Conclusion

Urine Human Papillomavirus Prevalence In Women With High-Grade Cervical Lesions
Fri, 17 Oct 2014 00:00:00 +0100 | European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology
Objective To determine the prevalence of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in urine samples from women with high-grade cervical lesions. Secondary objectives are to identify the influence of socio-demographic factors and the different genotypes with urinary HPV positivity.Study Design 75 women with a positive biopsy for CIN2 + were included in the study from October 2010 to July 2011. A sample of urine was collected immediately before conization at the outpatient clinic. We analyzed the presence of HPV using a PCR technique. (Source: European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology)

Prevalence of Anal Human Papillomavirus Infection Among HIV-Infected Women From India
Wed, 15 Oct 2014 03:51:56 +0100 | JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes
No abstract available (Source: JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes)

Human papillomavirus and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma: does ethnicity matter?
Wed, 15 Oct 2014 00:00:00 +0100 | British Journal of Dermatology
ORIGINAL ARTICLE, p 779 (Source: British Journal of Dermatology)

HPV vaccine strategies: equitable and effective?
Tue, 14 Oct 2014 00:00:00 +0100 | Sexually Transmitted Infections
Immunisation programmes are recognised as being among the world's most successful public health programmes. Their impact on rates of infectious diseases (and subsequent reduction in complications and health burden) makes them one among the most cost effective and economically attractive of all health interventions. Indeed, the influential 2008 Copenhagen Consensus identified childhood vaccines as the fourth ranked ‘best buy’ for all global development interventions.1 In the same year, the GAVI Alliance (a global public-private partnership that currently works to increase access to immunisations in 53 eligible low-income and lower-middle-income countries) prioritised support for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines—and this was followed by financial commitments in 2011, bas...